Friday, April 23, 2010

Friday Flowers: Fanciful Woodland Blooms

Forests have never frightened me even when I wander trails alone. As a child Santa did not need to be real, but fairies, elves and pixies were alive in my imagination. Each toadstool, tree knot, or shiny leaf was a home for my imaginary friends. Bell-shaped flowers played pretty melodies and the wind added a whispered tune in the leaves above.


I read Enid Blyton stories about these woodland characters who assisted humans in distress. I loved my Brownie troop and still have my badges and elf pin. After all, Brownies are helpful Fairies dedicated to a household or family. I thought dust particles in streams of sunlight were little magical creatures. (that explains my aversion to dusting)


Jack sits in the pulpit and there is room for more members of his congregation to share the canopied shelter. Dainty miniature flowers bloom at the bases of stumps and logs and their colourful petals are perfect for a gown or hat.


The woods are not lonely and many eyes watch from secret hiding places as my feet rustle through the dead leaves and pine needles on the forest floor. You may never know who is close by, motionless and quietly blending in with the textures and colours of nature.

11 comments:

  1. The woods really are alive with so much to see and enjoy.
    Blessings,Ruth

    ReplyDelete
  2. Mexico Mom11:40 pm GMT-4

    Love the little masked bandit peeking down at you. Another excellent post.

    ReplyDelete
  3. This is awesome. I particularly love the surprise at the end. :-)

    (Unfortunately, raccoons are much cuter to observe in the wild than they are when they are living in your chimney. Trust me!)

    :-) aletheia

    ReplyDelete
  4. Love how you captured the Trout Lily shadow image on the leave. You have a good way of looking at things.

    ReplyDelete
  5. That penultimate picture? Trout lilies -- just in case you didn't know. :)

    ReplyDelete
  6. It took me a second to see that little face! How cute! And, I love your reason not to like dusting Ruth. :c)

    ReplyDelete
  7. Talking of Enid Blyton's stories about "these woodland characters," Enid Blyton describes a lot about the environment in The Faraway Tree and Nature Lover's Collection. In fact, I discuss briefly Enid Blyton's love of the "state of nature" in my book on her, titled, The Famous Five: A Personal Anecdotage (www.bbotw.com).
    Stephen Isabirye

    ReplyDelete
  8. My niece just posted a sketch on her blog of Yarnwich the House Hobb. He scurries around your house when your not looking and cleans it. Makes his clothes out pieces of cloths and throw away objects for his tools. I want a Yarnwick in my house. Imgination is good for the soul at any age. Great Post, I love the catch at the end of he secret fellow watching you.

    ReplyDelete
  9. We always talk about the eyes that watch our progress when we take walks. Amazing how the creatures can be so camouflaged. Mingus spotted a deer just off the back trail the other day and I had to really strain to see it and probably wouldn't have except it made a movement.

    ReplyDelete
  10. I absolutely love to visit a forest where the little people live and feel so blessed when I spot one. Haven't seen a Jack in the pulpit in many years. Nice walk. Thanks for taking us along.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Thanks to all who commented. I know raccoons can be a nuisance, but everytime I see land cleared for more houses, I wonder how much habitat these creatures can stand to lose.
    ...I would hire a House Hobb in a second :-)

    ReplyDelete