Wednesday, March 18, 2015

A Worm of Robins


The collective noun for a group of American Robins is "A Worm of Robins". 

Who came up with this? Really! 

The British collective noun for the different bird they call a Robin is "A Round of Robins". I think that sounds a lot better, but the British are exceptionally clever with the English language. 

The fact is, I am very happy to see my first Robin every spring. Today felt like it should be the day so I tucked a small camera in my lunch bag and enlisted one of my patients, under the guise of participating in a walking program, to look for Robins with me. We checked out the ornamental cherry trees in the courtyard and chapel garden and only found a squirrel and two doves. 


When I left the building after work I spotted this Robin by the doorway. It hopped right up to me as if I might have a worm or grub to spare.  As it flew away, I realized I was surrounded by Robins in the trees and on the ground. 



This worm of Robins must have arrived together from the south and found the lawns and trees around the hospital favourable for food and a little warmth. Robins do not eat seeds at bird feeders but they will eat chopped apples, suet, mealworms, or softer nuts like pecans on a tray feeder. It is cold this week but the sun is slowly melting snow in south facing areas and they will likely find enough food.


Vernal equinox arrives at 6:45 PM on March 20th this year, but I think today was the first day of spring.

3 comments:

  1. The first Robins are so welcome. I saw two on my yard today and welcomed them back.

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  2. Definitely spring when the robins appear. But really, a worm of robins?

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  3. I am very fond of robins--I love their bright eyes and cheeky attitude.
    Oh, and when the babies are fledging, the parent robins so crazy--chirping noisily at any human who dares look at their wee bird.

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